The CSIRO’s new low-carb diet is all about tackling diabetes – Health News Today

The CSIRO has created a scientifically proven way to help you follow a low-carb diet, lose weight and better manage fluctuating blood sugar levels without having to eliminate delicious foods like pasta or potatoes from your diet.

The dieting solution from Australia’s national science agency, outlined in the recent CSIRO Low-Carb Diabetes Diet & Lifestyle Solution book released this month, is a 12-week eating plan that’s based on a culmination of published clinical trials dating up to 2019.

It teaches people living with type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, pre-diabetes and insulin resistance how to eat carbs in moderation and pair them with other foods to maximise weight loss success and glycaemic control.

“The types of foods mentioned in the daily food guides can also be adjusted to suit the tastes or needs of an individual, especially if someone comes from a diverse background.”

The book’s co-author, Dr Pennie Taylor, tells SBS the new eating plan also attempts to help families from culturally diverse backgrounds that face a genetic predisposition to diabetes to personalise their carb requirements.

“This diet shows people how to put foods together in a way that ensures their carbohydrates aren’t too high in one meal sitting,” says Dr Taylor, a nutritional scientist in clinical nutrition and lifestyle management at CSIRO.

The book includes 12 weeks of meal plans and daily food guides, a list of pantry staples as well as weekly shopping lists, 80 low-carb recipes and exercise tips.

“The types of foods mentioned in the daily food guides can also be adjusted to suit the tastes or needs of an individual, especially if someone comes from a diverse background.”

The low-carb diet that’s not only about carbs

Dr Taylor explains that the diet examines eating from a holistic lens and enables individuals to put together the right combination of foods to ensure their energy is released at an appropriate rate.

“When you pair protein foods with a carb, it blunts that carbohydrate release response into the blood,” she says. “Then, if you pair that carb and protein with a healthy fat, it will lower the blood glucose response again.

“So the idea behind this diet is that if you have a meal with protein, the [right amount of the right carbohydrate] and a healthy fat, it will help to lower day-to-day blood glucose variations.”

“If you’re going to have a sandwich, we recommend having an open sandwich with one slice of bread that is lower in carbohydrates and high in fibre (like wholegrain or rye) and have it with an egg, tomato and cheese on top.”

The diet does not demonise having an occasional indulgence like alcohol or saturated fat, or carb-rich foods like potatoes. However, it does advise eating these foods in controlled proportions. For example, starchy vegetables (potatoes and sweet potatoes) are listed in the bread and cereals category and recommended for consumption in limited amounts, according to the level…